Appointment With My Oncologist & A Big Milestone

When I had my appointment with my oncologist on August 5th, I was hoping that my red blood cell count would finally be in the normal range, but it isn’t quite there yet. I wasn’t too surprised as I have been tired lately and not feeling the greatest. At this point, nothing but time will help, so I am trying to be patient.

I am still having a lot of issues with my memory. It seems like only my short-term memory is being affected, but it is starting to drive me crazy. My oncologist asked me if I am still “fuzzy,” and I said that yes, I am still having issues. So, I am taking a week off Anastrozole to see if it helps clear my head or not.

The good news is that I have reached my first significant milestone! On May 23rd, one day after our 17th wedding anniversary, I made it to my second anniversary of being cancer-free! I am incredibly grateful that I have made it through the first two years, and I am hopeful that I will continue to stay healthy and cancer-free until my next milestone in another three years, at five years.

Once I have my next appointment in December, I will finally be on a different schedule with my oncologist. I will switch from seeing him every three or four months to every six months. I am making progress, and it feels good!

Long Break

Hi, I can’t believe that we are already in July and that it has been over three months since I published a post here! In my defense, I can tell you that I have had a lot going on since the middle of April.

In early May, I started looking for a house to move to because with the housing market going crazy, I was sure that the owner of the house we had been renting for the last six years would want to sell. About a week later, my suspicions were confirmed by a phone call from the owner. Finding a house was challenging because the home would be listed online, and not even 24 hours later, there were multiple applications on it. Right before we were due to leave on vacation, we went to see a house, and it was perfect! At first, we didn’t know if we had gotten it, but right before we flew out of town, we received the news that we had been approved and would get the keys on June 1st after we returned from vacation. So, my time was filled with stress from looking for a house and then getting ready to go on vacation, but it was worth it because we have moved into a house that is perfect for us and our vacation was wonderful!

While on vacation, we renewed our wedding vows on our 17th anniversary, and everything was perfect on our special day! Ocho Rios, Jamaica, is one of our favorite places to relax and reconnect with each other, so why not renew our vows while there. We were supposed to renew our vows two years ago, but between my breast cancer diagnosis and treatment in 2019 and Covid causing the world to stop in 2020, we had to post phone our trip and ceremony until this year.

I will update you with everything that has been going on over a few different posts in the coming days, which will include a huge milestone, a follow-up appointment with my surgeon, and how I am doing these days.

I will be back soon!

Three Month Follow-up with My Oncologist

Today I had my three-month follow-up appointment with my oncologist. As usual, we spoke about how I am doing on Anastrozole. I am continuing to do well with no major side effects. I still have eight years and ten months to go, but all should continue to go well as time passes by.

He also wanted an update on how I am doing since my last surgery, which was a month ago today. I told him that I am very happy with my results and that I have healed well with very little pain. He said that he finds that surgeons often don’t prepare their patients concerning the pain they will experience after surgery and how long it can go on. I agreed that realistic expectations aren’t discussed, and for me, that was hard because in April 2019, when my cancer was removed was the first surgery I have ever had in my life. Yes, I knew there would be a pain, but I would have never guessed at just how long after surgery I would still have pain here and there.

My blood work was done today as well, and my red blood cell count is still a little low. We are thinking that moving forward; my count will be a little low; it’s where my system has settled after everything I have gone through, and I am OK with that as long as I continue to stay healthy.

I am just about to reach my second significant milestone with my oncologist. I will have one more follow-up appointment in three months, and then I am graduating to the six-month plan, which signifies my being two years out from when I started chemotherapy with no recurrence. Over the next three years, I will see him every six months until I get to the five-year goal of being cancer-free. He was happy to tell me that I am still cancer-free and doing well! I am beyond grateful and happy!

.

My 5th Surgery: Follow-up Appointment WARNING: GRAPHIC SURGERY PHOTOS

Last Wednesday, I had an appointment at my surgeon’s office to have my steri-strips removed. I briefly noticed that when my appointment was made, the scheduler said a different name as far as who I would have my appointment with, and it was not my surgeon. I didn’t think much of it, and she didn’t say anything else about the appointment, so I didn’t ask her about it.

When I went to my appointment, I wasn’t too surprised that a different doctor, a PA, walked into the room with a nurse, but I was silently wondering what was going on. By this time, I was three weeks post-op, and out of about thirty steri-strips, I had only three left that were still attached to my incision, so removing them was quick and easy.

3.5 weeks after surgery

After he removed the steri-strips, I asked him, “so am I not seeing my surgeon anymore?” He looked surprised that I asked him that. He responded by asking and saying, “They didn’t tell you about me? I have so many years of experience.” No, they didn’t tell me that I would not be seeing my surgeon anymore. So he went on to say that he wanted to see me in two months, and my mind was racing. I asked him about my annual mammogram coming up in August. Last year, my surgeon ordered and scheduled my mammogram and reviewed the results with me. He said that he would release me to my regular physician and that his office could take care of it. I let him know that I had decided to find a different doctor to see and that since I see my Oncologist every three months and he draws my blood each time, I am not in a hurry to find a new doctor. He said he would see me after my mammogram in August, no need to come in, in two months.

I can’t remember my exact wording, but I told the PA that I would rather my surgeon order my mammogram and follow up with me like he did last year. He again told me how many years of experience he has, and I said, “I have been coming here for two years; it’s about my comfort level.” I didn’t want to insult him, but at the same time, I wanted to make sure that he understood what I was saying. So on my way out, I stopped by to schedule my follow-up appointment after my mammogram in August, with my surgeon. His office will schedule the mammogram a few days before the follow-up appointment, and they will let me know the dates and available times I can choose from.

I was numb when I got home from the appointment. I kept running the conversation I had with the PA through my mind. After getting over the initial shock of everything, I realized just how paralyzed and uncomfortable I was during the appointment, so I decided to call the office manager the next day and talk to her about it. When I spoke with her, I explained that I was uncomfortable during my appointment for several reasons. Not only was the PA a different doctor, but I have been my surgeon’s patient for over two years, so we have a rapport with each other, I am comfortable with him, and I trust him. Quite simply, I don’t know the PA, so I was uncomfortable as soon as he walked into the room. I told her that I was not informed that I would not be seeing my surgeon anymore, which didn’t help the situation. Also, because I have had so many surgeries, including breast implant placement, I want to continue to see my surgeon annually for my mammogram and exam. Yes, I could see any doctor for a mammogram, but he is a breast specialist, so it makes sense to see him for that particular part of my health plan each year. I also let her know that I was so uncomfortable that I held the paper top I had on closed until the PA went to look at my incision. If I had been seeing my surgeon, I wouldn’t have even put the left side up on my shoulder because I knew that he would be looking at my incision and removing any remaining steri-strips; again, it is about my comfort level.

She completely understood how I felt and said that the PA had been there since June 2020 to help out with follow-up and routine appointments because, sadly, my surgeon is inundated with patients. She said that some patients don’t care about seeing the PA, but some are like me and prefer seeing the surgeon. She apologized for how I felt and said that if I am uncomfortable seeing the PA, I don’t have to see him. She even put a flag on my file, noting that I only want to see my surgeon moving forward. I let her know that I would like to go ahead and see my surgeon for a follow-up in two months before I go on vacation, and she made that appointment for me.

Thanks to my call with the office manager, I feel much better about the whole situation, and I will confidently walk into my appointment in May. I didn’t ask her who was responsible for explaining to me about the PA and his role in my care; it doesn’t matter now that everything has been resolved. Was it wrong not to inform me? Absolutely! People make mistakes all the time, but I won’t let myself dwell on the situation. I am choosing to move forward knowing that my wishes will be honored.

Three Month Follow-up with My Oncologist

As I said in my previous blog post, I have had some struggles recently. I have been trying to write about what has been going on, but it has been challenging to put it into words. I am still not prepared, but there may never be a good time, so I may as well start to talk about it.

I had a check-up with my oncologist back on the 7th of January. I didn’t write about my appointment right away because it was an unusual appointment, not my usual, “Yes, I am doing fine on my medication. My sleep is improving, as I am averaging just one night a week, where I am still awake at 5 or 6 am, instead of several nights a week. I am still fighting fatigue…blah, blah, blah…”

My bloodwork has improved to where all of my levels are normal except for my red blood cell count, it’s still low, and unfortunately, it may be my regular reading from now on. It’s not terribly low at all, 4.18, where 4.20 to 5.40 is a normal range. But being even slightly low, I can feel it, so hearing that I might not ever be in the normal range makes me terribly sad as I hate feeling this way. I asked if there is anything I can do, that some cancer patients say that they take iron to fight the fatigue. My PA said that I could take iron, but she cautioned me that it could upset my stomach, so I should take it only every other day to start if I decide to try it. She also said that she had heard that there is a liquid version that might be easier to take, but she hasn’t seen it, so she wasn’t even sure where I could get it. I am on the fence about taking iron, so for now, I am not doing it.

My PA explained that one of the essential readings they are looking at when I come every three months is my Hgb or hemoglobin. Low hemoglobin levels usually indicate that a person has anemia. There are several kinds of anemia: Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common type. This form of anemia occurs when a person does not have enough iron in their body, and it cannot make the hemoglobin it needs. High Hgb is known as polycythemia. This means you have too many red blood cells. Polycythemia vera is a cancer of the blood in which your bone marrow overproduces red blood cells. With polycythemia, a blood test also shows a high red blood cell count and high hematocrit. So low or high Hgb would be bad for me, it would mean I am either anemic, which was also a concern during my chemo treatments, or I have cancer in my blood. My Hgb is a little low, only one point from the lowest acceptable level, but nothing to worry about for now.

Now for the tough part…for most of my appointment, I cried a lot. It was hard to talk about, even with my PA, whom I adore. I kept looking away from her while I was talking and crying; I was embarrassed. Why was I crying? It was a lot of things, but mainly the fact that I have had an overwhelming feeling of guilt recently. Why do I feel guilty? As it is, it’s hard being a cancer survivor, and for me, it is tough because I have always had a great deal of empathy for people, but now it includes other cancer patients. Recently quite a few people I know, through various ways, are dealing with having a cancer recurrence. I feel guilty because I am still doing well; I am OK for the most part. They are experiencing my greatest fear, and I am feeling guilty because it isn’t me. It is also a reminder that my breast cancer was incredibly aggressive, and it could return at any time.

It is easy for most to say, “don’t live in fear, don’t worry about it,” but honestly, someone who says that to me clearly doesn’t understand how horrifying it is to go from barely needing to see a doctor to countless scans, blood draws, chemotherapy, radiation and four surgeries in a matter of fourteen months. All three of my doctors, my cancer treatments, everything I went through saved my life without a doubt, but it also damaged me in every way. I don’t know if I will ever be myself again, many cancer patients tell me that I won’t be, but I am doing everything I can to defy that future.

At the end of February, I will reach the second anniversary of my first appointment with my surgeon when I was diagnosed with breast cancer. In many ways, I can’t believe that it has been that long already, and in other ways, it feels like it has been a lifetime.

Thank you for being here; it helps to know that people care enough to read my blog, that the information I am sharing helps other cancer patients and their caregivers, and it helps me in more ways than I can say.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

I can’t believe that it is already October 1st! Up until now, it seemed like 2020 was going by as slowly as possible, tormenting everyone with endless challenges and sacrifices. But it is finally October; Fall has begun, and the end of the year is around the corner.

I have to admit that October never really held any special significance for me in the past, but after going through my journey with breast cancer, it has a new meaning for me. October is a time to reflect on everything that I went through last year, to help newly diagnosed women in any way I can through a breast cancer app that I am active on, to support those going through treatments and surgeries, to chat with other survivors and see how they are coping, and to remember those that we have lost to this horrible disease.

I received a free eBook today that I want to share with everyone because, as I have learned over the last 19 months, knowledge is power! I share information that I trust with you, my readers, because I have been there. I know how scary the words “you have breast cancer” are and the thoughts that flood your brain after hearing it.

If you have any questions for me or if you just want someone to talk to, please contact me at any time. I have a Contact Me page on this website, or you can contact me through one of my Social Network links at the bottom of each page on this website.

Your free eBook, Breast Problems That Aren’t Breast Cancer, is here! We are thrilled to provide this helpful guide for you.

Click this link to get your free copy

Did you know National Breast Cancer Foundation is committed to helping people (including you!) with their breast health? NBCF is helping people at every step of the journey by providing breast health education, delivering access to vital early detection screenings and breast health services to those who could not otherwise afford them, and helping those diagnosed with breast cancer—and their families—navigate the complex cancer care system.

I hope you enjoy this free resource!

Exit mobile version
%%footer%%