Christmas 2020

Sorry, I know it’s been a while since I have written a blog entry. I have had a few readers asking me if I am OK in the meantime, and I am doing OK; it’s been tough for me lately, but I am hanging in there. I don’t want to go into detail yet; I am not ready, but I will write about it soon as it is important to me to be completely honest about what I am going through.

What can I say? The holidays proved to be more difficult than I had anticipated, so much so that I asked my husband if we could leave town. I couldn’t bear to spend another Christmas away from my Dad, my brother, sister-in-law, niece, and my cousin and his wife. With my Dad turning 90 years old this month and having had some recent medical procedures done, it was best to cancel Christmas. I would never forgive myself if I were the cause of my Dad contracting Covid-19, so I understood the decision; there was no choice.

We decided at the last minute, about a month out, to make plans to go to Jamaica for Christmas. We were excited to get everything booked and planned for our trip, but unfortunately, less than two weeks before departing, we were informed that the resort we wanted to go to was not going to reopen in time for our trip.

We ended up going to Turks & Caicos, which was a great decision as we have always wanted to go there but hadn’t had the chance to go yet. I will be honest, I did cry on Christmas day, and I was a little pissy. Even though I was in a beautiful place, I missed my family and needed to vent a bit and move on with the rest of my trip.

Here are a few pictures from our trip; I will post again over the weekend to update you about the check-up appointment I had with my oncologist last Thursday.

1 Year Update: Reconstruction, Breast Reduction & Port Removal Surgery **WARNING: GRAPHIC SURGERY PHOTOS**

Mood: Thoughtful & Grateful 😊

If you have not read my previous entries about this particular surgery, including photos, the links are listed below in order.

Reconstruction, Breast Reduction & Port Removal Surgery

Post Surgery Follow-Up **WARNING: GRAPHIC SURGERY PHOTOS**

A Month After Surgery **WARNING: GRAPHIC SURGERY PHOTOS**

On November 14th, 2019, I headed into surgery for the third time. I was excited about this surgery because my surgeon was fixing my lopsided chest. When I had my first surgery, he was removing cancer and planning for the reconstruction surgery that I would go through after chemotherapy. Now that chemotherapy was over, and we had given my body time to get rid of all of the drugs from sixteen treatments, I was ready for surgery.

As I said in my previous post about this surgery, my surgeon checked in on me before the surgery; he measured me, referenced his notes and pictures, and explained again in detail what he would be doing. He could see that I was nervous, so he assured me that while this would be my longest surgery to date, three to four hours, he was not worried about it at all and that I shouldn’t be worried either…I would be just fine, and as before, I would get through the surgery easily.

Recovering from this surgery, as far as pain was concerned, was not as difficult as recovering from my cancer surgery. I didn’t have any drains to deal with, which was great, but this time both of my breasts were opened up. I had cuts and sutures all over my chest, and coping with the trama of how I looked was difficult. I felt ugly, like I was a stitched up monster, so it was tough to look at myself in a mirror for the first few weeks of recovery.

Now it has been a year since this surgery, and I can’t believe how much my scars have faded! As time goes by, I am sure that my scars will fade even more; using Bio-Oil a few times a week seems to have helped immensely. πŸ™‚

Follow-up with My Oncologist

Mood: Ecstatic! 😁

Sorry…this post was scheduled to publish back on October 6th, but apparently, it didn’t show up in my blog…

I had a great check-up with my oncologist on October 6th! My white blood cell count is finally in the normal range…yay! My red blood cell count is still a little low, but it is nothing to be overly concerned about….I had a feeling that it was still down because I am continuing to deal with fatigue. There isn’t much I can do to help my immune system get back to normal other than what I am already doing. My body needs more time to heal from everything that I have been through, and he reminded me again that everything having to do with my treatments and surgeries has been a trauma to my whole being. Time, I just need more time….

I am doing well on my medication. I do not have any side effects to speak of now, so that has been a relief. Ten years is a long time to take medication, and sometimes it makes me sad that I have a little pill that I take daily that reminds me of everything that I have been through up until now but, I can’t imagine not taking it. I will never understand it, but many women opt out of taking hormone-based chemotherapy drugs. In my case, I would never forgive myself if my breast cancer returned and I couldn’t say that I had done everything possible to keep it from returning.

To end my appointment, we went over my mammogram and ultrasound results from August. He agreed with my surgeon that everything looks good and that I do not need to be concerned about the cysts. I would be lying if I said that I am not a little concerned in the back of my mind no matter what I am told, but I think that is normal for any cancer patient. Once we were done with our discussion and my questions about the cysts, he was pleased to tell me that I am officially cancer-free!! πŸ’• What an amazing feeling it was to hear him say that!

Birthday Trip 2020

Mood: Exhausted 😴

A few weeks ago, my husband and I were finally able to get away and take our annual birthday trip. This particular trip had been rescheduled a few times due to my chemo treatments last year, and the resort we wanted to go to, not opening when scheduled due to the pandemic.

It wasn’t easy to travel internationally during the pandemic, but it was well worth it. We had to get a COVID test within ten days of arriving in Jamaica, and within three days of arriving, we had to go online, fill out a form for each of us, and send our COVID results in for approval. So, time was short, especially to get the test results back and sent in. We didn’t hear anything back after a little over a day, and we started to panic, so we called our travel agent to see if she could help. It just so happens that she has a contact at the Jamaica Tourist Board, so she got in touch with her, had us send some information to her via email, and we had our approvals the day before we were scheduled to leave by 6:30 am the next morning. Whew!!

I am not going to go over all of the details of our trip because this isn’t a travel blog; it’s a blog concerning everything related to and revolving around my breast cancer. So, something happened while on our trip, and to say that my reaction shocked me is an understatement.

A few days before we left, I let my husband know that I was not ready for the trip as far as my energy level was concerned. I had been battling fatigue, and I still am to this day, so I was concerned that the trip was going to wear on me far more than it did back when I was healthy. But I needed the break as I had recently been under a lot of stress, and it felt like everything I was dealing with was becoming far too much for me. We all have our breaking point, right? Well I was very much on edge, and I knew that I was headed for a mental breakdown if I didn’t get away to relax and destress. As it turns out, I was right; about halfway through our trip, I was already physically exhausted even though I kept my activity level much lower than I usually do while on vacation. But I powered through because we had some wonderful surprises during our trip that made everything we had to go through to get there, worth it!

So two amazing things happened during our trip! The first was getting to see and spend time with a few employees from the resort we were supposed to go to. Because the original resort didn’t open on time, there are several people from the entertainment department that are traveling around and performing at some of the resorts that are open in Jamaica. We have been friends with these amazingly talented people for years and years, and they are like family to us. We hadn’t been able to see any of them in two years, so I was super excited when I found out that they would be at the resort we were going to. So we had a family reunion of sorts, and we were able to have lunch together quite a few times and find a little bit of time to spend together on the nights they were at the resort to perform.

It was amazing to get to spend with our friends, and it made me so happy! But, at some point during the trip, I don’t remember precisely when, out of nowhere, I had a complete breakdown. Sadness suddenly overcame me, and at first, I didn’t understand why. I was embarrassed because an employee saw me start to cry and walk away from where we were seated, and she followed us out of concern for me. It was very kind of her to check on me, but I was overcome with grief and sadness, not a good moment for me, especially while on vacation in my favorite place in the world. I remember feeling like I did when I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I asked, “why did this have to happen to me? why me?” while crying my eyes out. It was painful because I remembered how things were two years ago when I saw my friends. Life was normal two years ago; life was good, or so I thought. The reality is that I already had breast cancer in September 2018, but I didn’t know I had it; there were no signs of it at that time. I eventually calmed down and enjoyed the rest of our trip, but my breakdown was a harsh reminder that it had not been that long since I found the first tumor and started down the long road of fighting cancer.

Our friends & family in Jamaica

The second amazing thing that happened was getting to see two more of our friends from the scuba diving department. My husband is a Master Diver, and a considerable part of our trips involve him diving twice a day, every day. As with our friends from the entertainment department, we have known most of the dive crew at our favorite resort for years, so they are also like family. My husband received a curious message from a friend the day we arrived in Jamaica, and we didn’t understand what he meant until a few days later when he arrived at the resort to dive with my husband! It was an incredible surprise to see our friend and find out that he was staying for the week to dive specifically with my husband. Our friend lives in Ocho Rios, where our favorite resort is located, and that is one and a half hours from where we were. The next day our friend’s boss arrived at the resort and had lunch with us! So we had another friend of ours came to see us, and that was another wonderful surprise! It was great to see my husband so happy and enjoying his week with a dear friend and having a few surprises along the way; it absolutely made his trip!

All in all, we had a wonderful trip, and it was great to get away and relax somewhere besides home. The next time we can travel and see some of the people we love, I will not be surprised if I have the same reaction; in fact, I will be expecting it. I am human, after all, and I have a very different outlook on life after everything I have been through.

Cherish your family and friends, and stop taking people for granted because someday, they might not be there anymore.

Follow-up with My Surgeon

On Wednesday, I went to see my surgeon to go over the results of my mammogram and to have him take a look at my breast implants and surgery site from my surgery that was just about four months ago. When he came into the exam room, he said that yes, I have some small cysts in my right breast, but that he is 0% concerned about them. I asked him if the cysts could turn into cancer, and he said no, they wouldn’t as they are benign. I asked him if anything needs to be done about the cysts, and he said that we do not need to do anything concerning them; they will most likely go away with time. He said that he is very pleased with the images from my mammogram and ultrasound and that everything is clear and looks great! {He explained to me when he ordered the mammogram that we had to wait for at least six months after finishing my radiation treatments to do it, or the images would be cloudy, so that is why I had to wait so long.}

Next, he took a look at how I have healed from my last surgery and how my breast implants are settling in. Everything is looking good so far, but my chest has not finished settling into place, meaning that the area under my left breast, in particular, has not dropped down and rounded out, it is still somewhat flat. It takes time for the internal part of the chest to heal and for the implant to get into place, so there is nothing to be alarmed about; my body just needs more time.

We do have to watch for a complication from my breast implants. It is called Capsular Contracture, and it is a breast augmentation complication that develops when internal scar tissue forms a tight or constricting capsule around a breast implant, contracting it until it becomes misshapen and hard. When my surgeon put my breast implants in, he added donor tissue to help prevent this complication from happening, but that doesn’t mean that it won’t happen anyway. He said that if it does happen, I will need to gauge my level of pain, watch for distortion, let him know that I have a problem, and that I am in pain that I can’t bear. He explained that some patients would have a severe case of Capsular Contracture and have very little pain, while others would have a milder case and have horrible pain. He said that if the pain is too much for me, I need to tell him to fix it, meaning I will need to go into surgery and have my implants removed. Whether or not I would need to have a new set of implants put in or have them left out is hard to say; it just depends on the circumstances. Being the excellent surgeon that he is, he told me that this could happen when we were discussing the option of breast implants. I told him that it was worth the risk to me as I was feeling very out of proportion after my first reconstruction surgery. I wanted to feel like me again and not the stranger staring back at me in the mirror.

The reason why we were even discussing this horrible complication on Wednesday was that he pointed out that the implant in my left breast is much firmer than the implant in my right breast during my exam. The firmness is caused by the 25 radiation treatments that were part of the breast cancer treatment performed on my left breast. So, it is already firm, and I need to watch it and check to make sure that I don’t have any harder areas that could indicate a problem is developing.

Unless I notice anything in the meantime, I will not go back to follow-up with him until six months from now. I have fewer appointments with my oncologist and surgeon these days, a real sign that I am healing and adjusting to life after breast cancer. πŸ’•

My First Mammogram in 18 Months

On Monday, I had my first mammogram in 18 months. Once my temperature was checked, I signed the necessary paperwork, and then I went over to the registration area. I noticed while going through the process of registering that the paperwork from my surgeon ordering my mammogram, said to do an ultrasound “if medically necessary.” I prayed that I would not need an ultrasound because I knew that meant that they saw something during the mammogram and would need to take a closer look.

The breast center that I go to, which is in the same building as my surgeon and oncologist, takes terrific care of me. I barely waited for 5 minutes before the nurse came to get me to take me to the back so I could change into a gown. I love the gowns there, they are pre-heated, and so are the blankets! It’s the little things I guess, anything to feel more comfortable when you are waiting to go in to have your breasts smashed in a machine. I was incredibly nervous because I couldn’t help but think about the last time I had a mammogram; when the results said that I had a mass that was “highly suspicious of malignancy.”

When I went back for the mammogram, the first task we needed to take care of was to go over everything I had been through concerning my breast cancer and treatment. It was hard to recount everything from the number of treatments to how many surgeries I have had, what type of surgery it was, and when everything occurred. It was hard to go through the details, not because I couldn’t remember them but because I could, and it was just so much to go through in a short period of time. Even now, when I start thinking about everything that has happened, I get depressed, and sometimes I am brought to tears. I am lucky to be here, and I know that, but that fact doesn’t take away the memories and pain of every blood draw, surgery, and treatment that I have endured.

I didn’t realize how different the process of a mammogram would be with breast implants, so it was a shock to go through what seemed like twice as much imaging. First, I had a regular mammogram, and the standard trays were used with the usual amount of images being taken. But since I have breast implants, I had to have extra imaging done with my implants being pushed up and out of the way. I won’t lie, it was painful to have the edge of the metal platform jam into the scars under my breasts, but it was necessary to be in that position to move my implants out of the way. Once we had finished the mammogram, the tech had me go back to the waiting room while the doctor looked over the images. I waited for a few minutes, and when I saw the tech come back, I was hoping that it was time to leave, but no, the doctor asked for a few more images. So we went back to the mammogram room, and she took two more images, and then sent me back to the waiting room.

I waited for a few more minutes, and then a different and very pregnant tech came to get me. I noticed right away that she was taking me into the ultrasound room, and I immediately got upset. She told me not to worry and that this was normal, but I knew better. She only imaged my right breast, the side where I did not have breast cancer. Once she was finished getting more images, she took me back to the waiting room while the doctor took a look at the ultrasound images. After a few minutes, the mammogram tech came to take me back to the mammogram room for one last mammogram image of my right breast. Now my anxiety is starting to kick into high gear! “What did they find? Do I have cancer in my right breast now? I can’t go through everything again!” My mind was racing, and I wasn’t going to calm down until I knew what was going on. Still, at the same time, I truly appreciated that they were taking their time to make sure that they were able to see and identify what was showing up in the images and give my surgeon and me accurate information.

This time instead of taking me back to the waiting room, the tech had me wait in the mammogram room while the doctor took a look at the last image. She said that I might have to go back to the ultrasound room with the doctor so she could pinpoint the area that was causing concern. Sure enough, I went back into the ultrasound room, and the tech did some measuring and marked an area with a pen for the doctor. The doctor came in and took a few extra images, looked at everything carefully, and then told me that I have some tiny cysts in my right breast, but they are benign, there is no sign of cancer! 😊